A moneyless society through one design, many cities.

What is a moneyless society?

 

In this article, we define the term ‘moneyless society’, and explain the basic functioning of a ‘moneyless’ type of society. Note that the Auravana Project’s design specifications provide the full reasoning and descriptive operation of a society that works without money; this article is a brief introduction to the topic. Note that the term ‘moneyless society’ is, as the remainder of this article highlights, just another term for (i.e., a synonym for) that which has multiple names, including: resource-based economy (RBE), natural law/resource-based economy (NL/RBE), and community-type society (this last term is the one the Auravana Project generally uses to describe the top-level type of society it proposes). A moneyless-type of society may also be known as a ‘cashless society’; although, this term is also used to refer to a society where the money is digital (as in, digital currency), and not physical (as in, “cash”).

 

Fundamentally, a ‘moneyless society’ is a type of society where decisioning does not involve money; a is a type of society where relationships and economic fulfillment within the society are not transactional. In other words, a moneyless society is a society that does not use money as part of its socio-economic system -- money is not used as the basis for acquiring, developing, and distributing services and goods to the population. A moneyless society is, simply, a society that doesn’t encode market-based mechanisms, such as trade, barter, currency, or any other transactional-type relationship. Said in another way, a moneyless economic system is an economic system that doesn’t include the market mechanism(s) in decisioning (note that ‘economics’ refers to the acquisition and transformation of resources into needed services and goods). More technically speaking, the algorithms that form a moneyless society do not involve (encode or use) market mechanisms, such as, barter and money sequencing.

When the idea of ‘community’ is applied at the societal level, then a type of socio-decisioning system emerges that does not use money. A true societal-level community is a marketless type of operation. A community-type society is a moneyless society, because a community’s economic system does not use money (i.e., a community-type society is a type of society with an economic system that is of a ‘moneyless’ type). In other words, in contrast to a society that uses money, a resource-based economy (RBE) is a moneyless-type of society.

 

There are, at least, two possible types of societies (as sub-classified by their economic system):

 

  • societies with a market (and money); and
  • societies that do not have a market, and hence, do not use money.

 

Simply, a community-type society (an RBE or NL/RBE) does not have a market (and does not use money), and so, its economic system is sub-classified as ‘moneyless’. It is important to note here that the term ‘money-less’ implies a lack of some thing, and the concept cannot itself be reified (Read: the market and money are abstractions and do not exist, except for in the minds of those who carry the belief). Hence, a moneyless society is a type of society that simply doesn’t encode the additional layer of abstraction known commonly as ‘the market’ (and without the market, there is no emergence of the modern State).

 

Human beings evolved under moneyless (i.e., family) structures and conditions. In a community-type (moneyless) society, the population relies on systems science and engineering, grounded in life conceptions (i.e., the life ground, life value, life requirements), in order to plan, control, produce, and re-cycle service systems (commonly known as “goods and services”). Take note that the operation of a complexly technological, moneyless society is unlikely to be understood if systems science, systems engineering, and algorithmic decisioning are not understood.

 

A ‘community’ type of society has a ‘moneyless’ type of economic system (a.k.a., a moneyless socio-decisioning system). The Auravana Project, itself, exists to construct and operate a community-based (moneyless) society through the design and development of an emergent and unified, ‘societal system’ specification. Note that a ‘societal system’ is otherwise known as a ‘socio-economic’ or ‘socio-decisioning’ system (or model), which is documented through a [societal design] specification. This societal system [design] specification explains the operation of a moneyless society in its entirety.

 

In brief, the Auravana Project’s societal system specification is sub-composed of four societal sub-systems, which are common to every type of society. Simply, every [type of] society is sub-composed of the following four axiomatic societal [information] systems (a.k.a., the four societal sub-systems):

 

  1. Social;
  2. Decision;
  3. Lifestyle; and
  4. Material.

 

These four systems, together, form the axiomatic conceptual foundation of any given society, and their internal composition reveals and determines the type of society being designed and/or under observation. Every society has a societal-level information set. Part of that set is socially directional (the social system) and feeds into a set of decisional processes (the decision system), resulting in a state change in the material world (the material system) by the InterSystem Team, thus affecting the experienced lives (the lifestyle system) of everyone therein.

A community/moneyless societal system has a specific internal composition of these four systems. Other types of societies (e.g. market-type societies) have a different internal makeup of these four systems. In systems terminology, a market-type society (i.e. monied society) is an open system with ‘externalities’ (Read: damage to humans and the environment) as a natural consequence. Further, an open economic system has no ability to control, re-orient, or automate services and goods to the population without externalities, because it is an open system (and does not integrate feedback as a closed/unified system does).

 

Conversely, a community-type society is one where all human life requirements (i.e., real needs) are sufficiently accounted for, while at the same time, holistically accounting for available resources. Thus, because both life (e.g., human needs) and the environment are accounted for, there is sufficient information for a closed-loop system to emerge where feedback can be accurately integrated and used to intentionally re-orient and safely automate.

 

As people begin to recognize the earth as one large planetary ecosystem or biosphere, they sympathetically come to recognize the necessity for a commonly fulfilling approach to living and sharing life (and life’s resources) on the planet. In community (i.e., in a moneyless society), everyone’s needs are met, which allows the individuals therein to live in a free, safe and healthy environment, and lead productive and flourishing lives as they discover, learn, grow, and feel valued in collaborative relationship.

 

Although humans share a common planetary biosphere, their societal systems may (or may not) encode the idea that, “the planet’s resources are the common heritage of all the planet’s people”. Some societal systems recognize the earth as a whole planetary ecosystem (or, biosphere), and others do not. With a recognition of a common environmental heritage comes the awareness that humans have a common set of life needs (a.k.a., life requirements), which are of common interest to all of humankind. In other words, there are a common set of human needs (a.k.a. life requirements) related to all of humanity. That common interest extends beyond the social and into the environmental ecology from which all humans are common fulfilled (or otherwise, satiated in having their needs met). It is possible, now, to use the planet’s resources in an ecologically regenerative and life effective manner, while servicing the whole of humanity.

 

The Auravana Project presents a new societal paradigm with an emergent systems design model that is necessary in order to provide, sustain, and maintain the health and well-being of the planet and its inhabitants. One of today’s general challenges is helping humankind realize its interconnected nature. Therein, the challenge is that all humans exist in this planetary biosphere, however, most people living today do not see the world’s resources as a common heritage for all the world’s inhabitants. Facilitating a greater connection to and understand of the real world, even if it begins small, will transform human society from what it is currently into a great humane civilization. In a humane civilization, the needs of everyone are met as they live fulfilled and productive lives through cooperation and global access. Therein, when work is transparent (Read: open source) and considers that which is common, it becomes possible to safely engineer a societal system that fulfills all life requirements to the benefit of everyone and the ecology.

 

In a community-type (moneyless) society, there are two primary types of economic access, instead of the market-based three:

 

  1. Employer
  2. Employee
  3. Consumer

 

In community, there is:

 

  1. InterSystem Team access (i.e., work jobs related to the societal system), and
  2. Community access (i.e., access by everyone to community services produced through by means of the InterSystem Team).

 

There are many ways to develop and deliver services to the earth’s human population. Some of these ways (e.g., the market-State) promote inequality, dysfunction, and dis-ease, and others (e.g., a community-type society) promote human flourishing and sustained ecological well-being.

 

Necessarily, a ‘moneyless society’ is also an ‘open source society’. In an open source environment, there are only users, some of whom are also the designers, developers, and operators of the open source system. In an open source environment, the output of effort maintains the intention of benefiting everyone, even if the individual applying effort is doing it for their own direct benefit. In other words, all individuals in a community-type society are community-accessing ‘users’, some of whom are part of the ‘InterSystem Team’, whereupon they participate in the continued design, development, and operation the whole societal system (which provides access to all users, ‘global access’).

 

The earth is a planetary ecosystem (a biosphere) with a mesh of habitats that extend from the local through to the global. Humans can “boundary out” areas of the larger global habitat in order to control as their local ‘city’ habitats. In other words, from the larger, ecological-habitat service system, an organism can engineer its own locally controlled habitat, a ‘city’ (of note, the uncontrolled “wild” environment would therein be ‘care-taken’ in order to ensure the health of the overall habitat).

 

It is important to understand the Auravana Project’s organizational overview in order to discover how a moneyless society could exist, transpire, and evolve. A community-type (moneyless) societal system is materially composed of a network of integrated city systems that operate together to create a unified, global habitat service system (i.e., a single, global economic/access system). In other words, a moneyless societal system materializes as a network of integrated city systems that operate through a unified, global habitat service system consisting of all the cities in the network. The network of city systems is represented by the Global Habitat Service System (a.k.a., a true global access system), followed by the local city systems, represented by the Local Habitat Service Systems. Simply, there is one global conception of a service system for global design and accounting, and then, there are many locally materialized city expressions.

 

Summarily, a community-type (moneyless) society is composed of a set of interconnected, hierarchical systems that meet the required elements essential to support the survival of human and other life on earth. The total societal system may be briefly sub-composed as follows:

 

  1. One solar and planetary system >
  2. One unified societal system design [specification] >
  3. Four societal information sub-systems (social, decision, lifestyle, material) >
  4. One global habitat service system (network of city systems, the economic global access system) >
  5. The local habitat service systems (individual integrated city systems).

 

Whereupon, every city in the network is sub-composed of three ‘habitat service sub-systems’:

 

  1. The Life Support [Service] System (principal in hierarchy) is the priority, and foundations, all other systems (because, it provides for fundamental life existence).
  2. Therein, the Technology Support [Service] System technology is necessary for societal continuation, for meeting life and facility requirements.
  3. And then, the Facility Support [Service] System provides opportunities for growth, restoration, recreation, and exploration (once life’s requirements are sufficiently fulfilled, humanity’s higher potentials for life functioning become available).

 

 

*All the above systems interconnect and work together as one unified system. In order to understand the framework of operation of a moneyless society, the operation and interrelationship of each of these systems must be understood.

 

A community-type global habitat service system allows for each city system to locally control and engineer its own habitat in accordance with its population’s own local intentions and environment, which is necessary to provide for global human fulfillment and global ecological stability.

The material design of the local and global habitat service systems is a reflection, in part, of the global ecosystem [services] provided by the planet. Humanity exists on earth because of the natural ecosystem services that nature provides. In other words, nature provides a natural ecosystem for humanity to exist on the planet.  Thusly, humanity has a common interest in the ecosystem, because it provides services that humankind relies on to survive, thrive, and ultimately, flourish.

 

It is possible to intelligently design and select the algorithms that compose society (e.g., mental algorithms, software algorithms, and materially encoded hardware “algorithms”). A moneyless, fulfillment-oriented society composes its algorithms openly, together, and exposes them to testing. Whereupon, a common integrating feedback loop discovers a greater understanding of what exists, and what is required, while the societal system as a whole, simultaneously, resolves the socio-decisioning space in alignment with a common, fulfillment-oriented direction. In community, the decisioning process uses objective information to inform (and thus, resolve) every social decision space. Some of that objective information can even become part of the information system itself. And, new situational information informs each new situational decision spaces.

 

Fundamentally, every society is information-based and has the same four fundamental information systems (social, decision, lifestyle, and material). When a system is said to be information-based, that means that it is computed. Said in a slightly different way, “If society is information based, then it is computed”. A computed system is a system that is based on information that has to be produced. Because every society is information based, every society can be simulated (Read: the iterating visualization of computation). However, not all societies recognize their information basis. A community-type society is a type of society that recognizes its information basis. By recognizing that it is based on information, the societal system can apply information processing to compute the current and future probable states of its materialized expression. In other words, a moneyless society uses computed information within its societal information system to ensure economic access and maintain environmental stability without the use of money. Any technologically complex, moneyless society is a computed society (i.e., a society that has awareness of its information system and uses computation therein); it is a type of society recognizably based upon a unified information system. Information in the information system is computed in order to effectively orient toward some intended direction (e.g., human fulfillment).

 

In any given society (because all societies are information based), there are two sources of new information:

 

  1. The information system, itself, processes information to produce more (useful) information.
  2. The information system acquires and interprets (inputs) information from the natural (law) environment.

 

Today, it is now possible to simulate society at both the pure information-level as well as the material operations-level. In other words, it is possible with today’s knowledge and technology to simulate the whole societal system, from its top-level information system through to the material operation of each of its materially extant city systems. Simulation may be used to model, predict, and test information and object flows within any societal system, and it is used in a moneyless society for discovery and design. Through design and simulation, it becomes relatively easy to engineer the next iterative state of a societal system as better (for everyone) than the last. The very idea of ‘societal engineering’ is the idea of working on (and contributing to) the unified societal specification or the operation of some part of its expressed, total habitat service system.

 

Take note here that just as information systems and human systems can evolve and de-evolve, so too can habitats in their ability to facilitate and sustain more complex life functioning. For any system, at any point in time, there exists a direction of functional capability, from that of evolution through to de-evolution, and the eventual absence of life if de-evolution continues (or, the de-evolved destroy themselves). Information systems evolve by lowering their entropy. Bits in an information system can be randomed or ordered. If ‘information’ is ordered bits, then entropy is a measure of disorder. If all bits are random, then there is maximum entropy. If bits in the information system become ordered, then entropy is lowered. When a [societal] system creates more information that is more useful, the system evolves. Similarly, coordinating the development of a controlled habitat to sustain more complex life function could be said to represent the evolution of an organism(s) and its habitat.

 

Working moneyless societies recognize the social nature of the human organism within their [informational] social system. Take note here that ‘optimization’ is a principal attribute of information/computed systems. With this background in mind, the way a social system optimizes itself, is if the individuated units therein are cooperative and work together, as opposed toward opposite ends. Cooperation optimizes a social system, orienting the whole of society toward order and lower entropy (i.e., toward greater fulfillment and functional life complexity). It is, in part, through contribution (which necessitates cooperation) that a moneyless society emerges. The opposite path for the individual, and society (in general), is fear. Those who fear are highly likely to tear down, pull apart, and not cooperate. Those in fear do not cooperate, in part, because of a lack of trust (often due to environmental conditioning environmental variables). Therein, if people can’t trust one another, then it is hard (if not impossible) to build something with more life complexity and lower entropy, together (i.e., to build a community-type ‘moneyless’ society). The fear mentality project the idea that the “others”, who are untrusted, could/will always take advantage of what “you” do. It is this fear response, in part, that places artificial limits on cooperation and generates unnecessary conflict.

A moneyless society through one design, many cities.

What is a moneyless society?

 

In this article, we define the term ‘moneyless society’, and explain the basic functioning of a ‘moneyless’ type of society. Note that the Auravana Project’s design specifications provide the full reasoning and descriptive operation of a society that works without money; this article is a brief introduction to the topic. Note that the term ‘moneyless society’ is, as the remainder of this article highlights, just another term for (i.e., a synonym for) that which has multiple names, including: resource-based economy (RBE), natural law/resource-based economy (NL/RBE), and community-type society (this last term is the one the Auravana Project generally uses to describe the top-level type of society it proposes). A moneyless-type of society may also be known as a ‘cashless society’; although, this term is also used to refer to a society where the money is digital (as in, digital currency), and not physical (as in, “cash”).

 

Fundamentally, a ‘moneyless society’ is a type of society where decisioning does not involve money; a is a type of society where relationships and economic fulfillment within the society are not transactional. In other words, a moneyless society is a society that does not use money as part of its socio-economic system -- money is not used as the basis for acquiring, developing, and distributing services and goods to the population. A moneyless society is, simply, a society that doesn’t encode market-based mechanisms, such as trade, barter, currency, or any other transactional-type relationship. Said in another way, a moneyless economic system is an economic system that doesn’t include the market mechanism(s) in decisioning (note that ‘economics’ refers to the acquisition and transformation of resources into needed services and goods). More technically speaking, the algorithms that form a moneyless society do not involve (encode or use) market mechanisms, such as, barter and money sequencing.

When the idea of ‘community’ is applied at the societal level, then a type of socio-decisioning system emerges that does not use money. A true societal-level community is a marketless type of operation. A community-type society is a moneyless society, because a community’s economic system does not use money (i.e., a community-type society is a type of society with an economic system that is of a ‘moneyless’ type). In other words, in contrast to a society that uses money, a resource-based economy (RBE) is a moneyless-type of society.

 

There are, at least, two possible types of societies (as sub-classified by their economic system):

 

  • societies with a market (and money); and
  • societies that do not have a market, and hence, do not use money.

 

Simply, a community-type society (an RBE or NL/RBE) does not have a market (and does not use money), and so, its economic system is sub-classified as ‘moneyless’. It is important to note here that the term ‘money-less’ implies a lack of some thing, and the concept cannot itself be reified (Read: the market and money are abstractions and do not exist, except for in the minds of those who carry the belief). Hence, a moneyless society is a type of society that simply doesn’t encode the additional layer of abstraction known commonly as ‘the market’ (and without the market, there is no emergence of the modern State).

 

Human beings evolved under moneyless (i.e., family) structures and conditions. In a community-type (moneyless) society, the population relies on systems science and engineering, grounded in life conceptions (i.e., the life ground, life value, life requirements), in order to plan, control, produce, and re-cycle service systems (commonly known as “goods and services”). Take note that the operation of a complexly technological, moneyless society is unlikely to be understood if systems science, systems engineering, and algorithmic decisioning are not understood.

 

A ‘community’ type of society has a ‘moneyless’ type of economic system (a.k.a., a moneyless socio-decisioning system). The Auravana Project, itself, exists to construct and operate a community-based (moneyless) society through the design and development of an emergent and unified, ‘societal system’ specification. Note that a ‘societal system’ is otherwise known as a ‘socio-economic’ or ‘socio-decisioning’ system (or model), which is documented through a [societal design] specification. This societal system [design] specification explains the operation of a moneyless society in its entirety.

 

In brief, the Auravana Project’s societal system specification is sub-composed of four societal sub-systems, which are common to every type of society. Simply, every [type of] society is sub-composed of the following four axiomatic societal [information] systems (a.k.a., the four societal sub-systems):

 

  1. Social;
  2. Decision;
  3. Lifestyle; and
  4. Material.

 

These four systems, together, form the axiomatic conceptual foundation of any given society, and their internal composition reveals and determines the type of society being designed and/or under observation. Every society has a societal-level information set. Part of that set is socially directional (the social system) and feeds into a set of decisional processes (the decision system), resulting in a state change in the material world (the material system) by the InterSystem Team, thus affecting the experienced lives (the lifestyle system) of everyone therein.

A community/moneyless societal system has a specific internal composition of these four systems. Other types of societies (e.g. market-type societies) have a different internal makeup of these four systems. In systems terminology, a market-type society (i.e. monied society) is an open system with ‘externalities’ (Read: damage to humans and the environment) as a natural consequence. Further, an open economic system has no ability to control, re-orient, or automate services and goods to the population without externalities, because it is an open system (and does not integrate feedback as a closed/unified system does).

 

Conversely, a community-type society is one where all human life requirements (i.e., real needs) are sufficiently accounted for, while at the same time, holistically accounting for available resources. Thus, because both life (e.g., human needs) and the environment are accounted for, there is sufficient information for a closed-loop system to emerge where feedback can be accurately integrated and used to intentionally re-orient and safely automate.

 

As people begin to recognize the earth as one large planetary ecosystem or biosphere, they sympathetically come to recognize the necessity for a commonly fulfilling approach to living and sharing life (and life’s resources) on the planet. In community (i.e., in a moneyless society), everyone’s needs are met, which allows the individuals therein to live in a free, safe and healthy environment, and lead productive and flourishing lives as they discover, learn, grow, and feel valued in collaborative relationship.

 

Although humans share a common planetary biosphere, their societal systems may (or may not) encode the idea that, “the planet’s resources are the common heritage of all the planet’s people”. Some societal systems recognize the earth as a whole planetary ecosystem (or, biosphere), and others do not. With a recognition of a common environmental heritage comes the awareness that humans have a common set of life needs (a.k.a., life requirements), which are of common interest to all of humankind. In other words, there are a common set of human needs (a.k.a. life requirements) related to all of humanity. That common interest extends beyond the social and into the environmental ecology from which all humans are common fulfilled (or otherwise, satiated in having their needs met). It is possible, now, to use the planet’s resources in an ecologically regenerative and life effective manner, while servicing the whole of humanity.

 

The Auravana Project presents a new societal paradigm with an emergent systems design model that is necessary in order to provide, sustain, and maintain the health and well-being of the planet and its inhabitants. One of today’s general challenges is helping humankind realize its interconnected nature. Therein, the challenge is that all humans exist in this planetary biosphere, however, most people living today do not see the world’s resources as a common heritage for all the world’s inhabitants. Facilitating a greater connection to and understand of the real world, even if it begins small, will transform human society from what it is currently into a great humane civilization. In a humane civilization, the needs of everyone are met as they live fulfilled and productive lives through cooperation and global access. Therein, when work is transparent (Read: open source) and considers that which is common, it becomes possible to safely engineer a societal system that fulfills all life requirements to the benefit of everyone and the ecology.

 

In a community-type (moneyless) society, there are two primary types of economic access, instead of the market-based three:

 

  1. Employer
  2. Employee
  3. Consumer

 

In community, there is:

 

  1. InterSystem Team access (i.e., work jobs related to the societal system), and
  2. Community access (i.e., access by everyone to community services produced through by means of the InterSystem Team).

 

There are many ways to develop and deliver services to the earth’s human population. Some of these ways (e.g., the market-State) promote inequality, dysfunction, and dis-ease, and others (e.g., a community-type society) promote human flourishing and sustained ecological well-being.

 

Necessarily, a ‘moneyless society’ is also an ‘open source society’. In an open source environment, there are only users, some of whom are also the designers, developers, and operators of the open source system. In an open source environment, the output of effort maintains the intention of benefiting everyone, even if the individual applying effort is doing it for their own direct benefit. In other words, all individuals in a community-type society are community-accessing ‘users’, some of whom are part of the ‘InterSystem Team’, whereupon they participate in the continued design, development, and operation the whole societal system (which provides access to all users, ‘global access’).

 

The earth is a planetary ecosystem (a biosphere) with a mesh of habitats that extend from the local through to the global. Humans can “boundary out” areas of the larger global habitat in order to control as their local ‘city’ habitats. In other words, from the larger, ecological-habitat service system, an organism can engineer its own locally controlled habitat, a ‘city’ (of note, the uncontrolled “wild” environment would therein be ‘care-taken’ in order to ensure the health of the overall habitat).

 

It is important to understand the Auravana Project’s organizational overview in order to discover how a moneyless society could exist, transpire, and evolve. A community-type (moneyless) societal system is materially composed of a network of integrated city systems that operate together to create a unified, global habitat service system (i.e., a single, global economic/access system). In other words, a moneyless societal system materializes as a network of integrated city systems that operate through a unified, global habitat service system consisting of all the cities in the network. The network of city systems is represented by the Global Habitat Service System (a.k.a., a true global access system), followed by the local city systems, represented by the Local Habitat Service Systems. Simply, there is one global conception of a service system for global design and accounting, and then, there are many locally materialized city expressions.

 

Summarily, a community-type (moneyless) society is composed of a set of interconnected, hierarchical systems that meet the required elements essential to support the survival of human and other life on earth. The total societal system may be briefly sub-composed as follows:

 

  1. One solar and planetary system >
  2. One unified societal system design [specification] >
  3. Four societal information sub-systems (social, decision, lifestyle, material) >
  4. One global habitat service system (network of city systems, the economic global access system) >
  5. The local habitat service systems (individual integrated city systems).

 

Whereupon, every city in the network is sub-composed of three ‘habitat service sub-systems’:

 

  1. The Life Support [Service] System (principal in hierarchy) is the priority, and foundations, all other systems (because, it provides for fundamental life existence).
  2. Therein, the Technology Support [Service] System technology is necessary for societal continuation, for meeting life and facility requirements.
  3. And then, the Facility Support [Service] System provides opportunities for growth, restoration, recreation, and exploration (once life’s requirements are sufficiently fulfilled, humanity’s higher potentials for life functioning become available).

 

 

*All the above systems interconnect and work together as one unified system. In order to understand the framework of operation of a moneyless society, the operation and interrelationship of each of these systems must be understood.

 

A community-type global habitat service system allows for each city system to locally control and engineer its own habitat in accordance with its population’s own local intentions and environment, which is necessary to provide for global human fulfillment and global ecological stability.

The material design of the local and global habitat service systems is a reflection, in part, of the global ecosystem [services] provided by the planet. Humanity exists on earth because of the natural ecosystem services that nature provides. In other words, nature provides a natural ecosystem for humanity to exist on the planet.  Thusly, humanity has a common interest in the ecosystem, because it provides services that humankind relies on to survive, thrive, and ultimately, flourish.

 

It is possible to intelligently design and select the algorithms that compose society (e.g., mental algorithms, software algorithms, and materially encoded hardware “algorithms”). A moneyless, fulfillment-oriented society composes its algorithms openly, together, and exposes them to testing. Whereupon, a common integrating feedback loop discovers a greater understanding of what exists, and what is required, while the societal system as a whole, simultaneously, resolves the socio-decisioning space in alignment with a common, fulfillment-oriented direction. In community, the decisioning process uses objective information to inform (and thus, resolve) every social decision space. Some of that objective information can even become part of the information system itself. And, new situational information informs each new situational decision spaces.

 

Fundamentally, every society is information-based and has the same four fundamental information systems (social, decision, lifestyle, and material). When a system is said to be information-based, that means that it is computed. Said in a slightly different way, “If society is information based, then it is computed”. A computed system is a system that is based on information that has to be produced. Because every society is information based, every society can be simulated (Read: the iterating visualization of computation). However, not all societies recognize their information basis. A community-type society is a type of society that recognizes its information basis. By recognizing that it is based on information, the societal system can apply information processing to compute the current and future probable states of its materialized expression. In other words, a moneyless society uses computed information within its societal information system to ensure economic access and maintain environmental stability without the use of money. Any technologically complex, moneyless society is a computed society (i.e., a society that has awareness of its information system and uses computation therein); it is a type of society recognizably based upon a unified information system. Information in the information system is computed in order to effectively orient toward some intended direction (e.g., human fulfillment).

 

In any given society (because all societies are information based), there are two sources of new information:

 

  1. The information system, itself, processes information to produce more (useful) information.
  2. The information system acquires and interprets (inputs) information from the natural (law) environment.

 

Today, it is now possible to simulate society at both the pure information-level as well as the material operations-level. In other words, it is possible with today’s knowledge and technology to simulate the whole societal system, from its top-level information system through to the material operation of each of its materially extant city systems. Simulation may be used to model, predict, and test information and object flows within any societal system, and it is used in a moneyless society for discovery and design. Through design and simulation, it becomes relatively easy to engineer the next iterative state of a societal system as better (for everyone) than the last. The very idea of ‘societal engineering’ is the idea of working on (and contributing to) the unified societal specification or the operation of some part of its expressed, total habitat service system.

 

Take note here that just as information systems and human systems can evolve and de-evolve, so too can habitats in their ability to facilitate and sustain more complex life functioning. For any system, at any point in time, there exists a direction of functional capability, from that of evolution through to de-evolution, and the eventual absence of life if de-evolution continues (or, the de-evolved destroy themselves). Information systems evolve by lowering their entropy. Bits in an information system can be randomed or ordered. If ‘information’ is ordered bits, then entropy is a measure of disorder. If all bits are random, then there is maximum entropy. If bits in the information system become ordered, then entropy is lowered. When a [societal] system creates more information that is more useful, the system evolves. Similarly, coordinating the development of a controlled habitat to sustain more complex life function could be said to represent the evolution of an organism(s) and its habitat.

 

Working moneyless societies recognize the social nature of the human organism within their [informational] social system. Take note here that ‘optimization’ is a principal attribute of information/computed systems. With this background in mind, the way a social system optimizes itself, is if the individuated units therein are cooperative and work together, as opposed toward opposite ends. Cooperation optimizes a social system, orienting the whole of society toward order and lower entropy (i.e., toward greater fulfillment and functional life complexity). It is, in part, through contribution (which necessitates cooperation) that a moneyless society emerges. The opposite path for the individual, and society (in general), is fear. Those who fear are highly likely to tear down, pull apart, and not cooperate. Those in fear do not cooperate, in part, because of a lack of trust (often due to environmental conditioning environmental variables). Therein, if people can’t trust one another, then it is hard (if not impossible) to build something with more life complexity and lower entropy, together (i.e., to build a community-type ‘moneyless’ society). The fear mentality project the idea that the “others”, who are untrusted, could/will always take advantage of what “you” do. It is this fear response, in part, that places artificial limits on cooperation and generates unnecessary conflict.

A moneyless society through one design, many cities.

A moneyless society through one design, many cities.
A moneyless society through one design, many cities.